Experts believe there's going to be a meat shortage in the very near future.

Enter your number to get our free mobile app

It was once hard to find toilet paper and cleaning products in New York supermarkets and experts now say meats will be next.

“The food supply chain is breaking,” Tyson Foods Chairman John Tyson said on Saturday.

Tyson Foods, the biggest meat company in the nation, announced it's being forced to close it's largest pork plant in Iowa on Tuesday due to the coronavirus outbreak pandemic.

"The food supply chain is vulnerable. As pork, beef and chicken plants are being forced to close, even for short periods of time, millions of pounds of meat will disappear from the supply chain. As a result, there will be limited supply of our products available in grocery stores until we are able to reopen our facilities that are currently closed," Tyson said.

Experts believe by the end of this week, or by next week, groceries will have limited supplies of beef, pork and chicken.

"My guess is around May 1, shortages will begin developing at retail meat counters," Livestock analyst with Archer Financial Services Dennis Smith told NBC News. "We've just completed our third week of reduced slaughter and production."

Smith reports overall meat production is down 25 percent.

Bloomberg reports about 33 percent of America's pork capacity is down while JBS SA, the world's largest meat company, is being forced to shut down facilities. Meanwhile, Brazil, the top shipper for chicken and beef, had to shut down a chicken plant due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It’s a lose-lose situation where we have producers at the risk of losing everything and consumers at the risk of paying higher prices. Restaurants in a week could be out of fresh ground beef. It’s absolutely unprecedented," Global AgriTrends President Brett Stuart told Bloomberg.

Delmarva Poultry Industry, a Delaware chicken plant says its being forced to kill 2 million chickens due to the coronavirus, according to Business Insider. Company officials say "If no action were taken, the birds would outgrow the capacity of the chicken house to hold them."