Time to check your freezer! The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a recall on some popular frozen prepared chicken products for possible links to a salmonella outbreak.

The CDC issued the recall on August 11, 2021, for a variety of frozen, raw chicken products sold under three different names. These products are raw frozen chicken that has been breaded, stuffed and pre-browned. There are five products in total that are affected by the recall. If you believe you have these products in your home don't eat them due to possible Salmonella.

Products affected are: (This list directly from the CDC Bulletin)

  • Dutch Farms Chicken with Broccoli & Cheese (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Milford Valley Chicken with Broccoli & Cheese (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Milford Valley Chicken Cordon Bleu (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Kirkwood Raw Stuffed Chicken, Broccoli & Cheese (lot code BR 1055; best if used by Feb 24 2023)
  • Kirkwood Raw Stuffed Chicken Cordon Bleu (lot code BR 1056; best if used by Feb 25 2023)

According to the information released from the CDC the Salmonella was actually found in an unopened package of the product found in the home of someone who got sick. This particular outbreak has been found in 8 states including New York.

What Should You Do If You Have One of These Products?

Most importantly don't eat them. Throw them away or return them to the store where you purchased them. Also, be sure to wipe down any surface that came in contact with the product. Use hot water and soap. Put any dishes through a dishwasher.

What Are the Symptoms of Salmonella Illness?

Diarrhea and a fever higher than 102 degrees can be symptoms of Salmonella illness. There can be vomiting and dehydration. It is important that if you think you have been infected that you contact your healthcare professional. Most people get sick 6 hours to 6 days after ingesting the bacteria and usually recover in approximately 4 to 7 days according to the CDC.

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