New York law enforcement was able to assist U.S. Marshalls after a fugitive labeled as "dangerous" escaped custody in New Hampshire on Monday.

Facebook/Belknap County Sheriff Department
Facebook/Belknap County Sheriff Department
loading...

New York Law Enforcement Involved with Fugitive Escape

Authorities say that Peter John DiBiaso escaped custody in Laconia, New Hampshire late Monday night in anticipation of a pre-trial hearing for numerous charges leveled against him. U.S. Marshalls say charges included stalking and criminal threatening with a deadly weapon amongst others. While the nature of his escape is still murky, authorities shared these details with the public:

Facebook/Belknap County Sheriff Department
Facebook/Belknap County Sheriff Department
loading...

Peter DiBiaso [has] escaped from the custody of the Belknap County Jail. Mr. DiBiaso should be considered dangerous based on the escape status only... No force is believed to have been used during his escape.

Luckily, DiBaiso was captured less than 48 hours later, though he had already made it across state lines. "UPDATE: CAPTURED" began a Facebook post from the Belknap County Sheriff Department. "Peter DiBiaso is in custody of Law Enforcement in New York. We are working on the extradition process to get him back to the State to answer to these crimes." This isn't the first time this year something like this has happened.

Get our free mobile app

Fugitives in New York

Back in March, an alleged hitman for an organized crime family from Rochester, NY named Dominic Taddeo escaped custody while in a halfway house. This time, the situation was reversed. Instead of an out-of-state fugitive being captured in New York like DiBaiso, Taddeo was serving time for crimes committed in New York, but was captured in Florida.

25 True Crime Locations: What Do They Look Like Today?

Below, find out where 25 of the most infamous crimes in history took place — and what the locations are used for today. (If they've been left standing.)

LOOK: Food history from the year you were born

From product innovations to major recalls, Stacker researched what happened in food history every year since 1921, according to news and government sources.